Ocean News

Researchers Remind Big Potential in the Coastal Zone Indonesia

Senior Scholar Linwood Pendleton,said the Indonesian coastal areas have a high potential that needs to be preserved. The talk was part of a lecture series put on by the Embassy of the United States Jakarta-Indonesia U.S. Speaker and Specialist Program.
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Deep Sea Mining: Out of Sight, Out of Mind?

One of the major issues with deep-sea mining is that so little is known about its implications on the environment. Linwood Pendleton, senior scholar at the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, comments in this blog post by Columbia University's Earth Institute. 

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Deep Sea being Damaged by Mining, Trawling

The deep sea especially that around continental shelves is being damaged by trawling and mining. Often there is little legislative protection, and developing countries are targeted. The Nicholas Institute's Linwood Pendleton discusses the deep sea on Radio National's "The Science Show."

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Deep-Sea Ocean Ecosystems Endangered

Relentlessly rising human demand for for deep-sea resources — fish, gas and oil, rare materials — is posing such a risk that international cooperation is needed if aquatic ecosystems are to be saved, U.S. scientists warn. Nicholas Institute Senior Scholar Linwood Pendleton comments in this Japan Times article.

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Scientists Call for Tougher Treaty to Protect the Deep Ocean

A new international agreement is needed to police the exploitation of the deep ocean because of the rising threats of deep-sea mining and bottom trawling for fish

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Gold Rush on the Seabed

Inventories of precious metals such as nickel, manganese, copper or cobalt slumber in the depths of our oceans. They are sought-after commodities for smartphones, electric cars or wind turbines. In two years, first mining licenses to be awarded. Experts fear irreparable environmental damage. The Nicholas Institute's Linwood Pendleton comments in this Voice of Switzerland article.

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Scientists Warn of Deep-Sea Mining's Destructive Potential, Want "New Stewardship" of Oceans

Thanks to advancements in robotics, deep-sea mining is rapidly approaching, especially for rare earth minerals that can be difficult to find in commercial quantities elsewhere. That's why a group of scientists have been trying to warn the public about the dangers of deep sea mining and calling for a "new stewardship" of our oceans.

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Deep Oceans Need ‘Stewardship’ to Prevent Industrial Damage

The deep ocean is Earth’s least explored environment, but that is rapidly changing. Scientists are calling for a new stewardship ethic as technological advances open the ocean deeps to the extraction of oil and gas, minerals and precious metals, and the dwindling supply of land-based materials creates economic incentives for deep sea industrialization. The Nicholas Institute's Linwood Pendleton comments in this Environment News Service article.

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Oil, Gas Exploration, Fishing Endangering Ocean Ecosystems Say Scientists

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Experts Call for Improved ‘Stewardship’ for Deep Sea Mining

Mining of the ocean floor, discussed since Jules Verne wrote 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, will soon become reality – and experts are calling for improved international “stewardship”. Researchers told the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s annual meeting that action was needed to ensure that minerals were extracted in a way that is environmentally sound. Linwood Pendleton, senior scholar at the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, comments in this Financial Times article.

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